Common dolphin
whale fluke
Common dolphin
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'The good thing about Science is it is true whether you believe it or not.'
Neil de Grasse Tyson

'The good thing about Science is that its true whether you believe it or not.'
Neil de Grasse Tyson

'The good thing about Science is that its true whether you believe it or not.'
Neil de Grasse Tyson

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We cannot protect what we do not understand.

We cannot protect what we do not understand.

We cannot protect what we do not understand.

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Science helps us understand.

Science helps us understand.

Science helps us understand.

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Cetacean SisterTM

A science engagement and education program that inspires women and provides an opportunity to experience cetacean research through science and cetacean workshops.

#FinIDatSea

Contribute your dolphin photos, taken whilst onboard a tour vessel or ferry, to scientists and their research project.

 

Victorian Common Dolphin Project

Common dolphins reside in Port Phillip. Can they be sighted regularly anywhere else along the Victorian coastline?

#the_caffeinated_biologist

Cetacean research and caffeination, is there anything better in life?

 

 

Common dolphins
Image taken under a DELWP research permit

 Cetacean Science Connections

Cetacean Science Connections (pronounced sea tey shuhn) is a social enterprise with the goal to connect people and communities to their local cetaceans – whales and dolphins – and their environment through science.

 

Cetacean SistersTM

Cetacean Sisters™, a science engagement and education program that inspires women and provides an opportunity to experience cetacean research through science and cetacean workshops.

 

Common dolphin
Image taken under a DELWP research permit,
Slide One
Why I'm a cetacean steward ...

“A fascination in the natural world has been a life-long interest with animals being my passion. I am blessed to have a close affinity with all animals. I would like to leave this world a better place than I found it – and there is certainly much to be done. There are many little things we all can do to improve and heal our planet and one is volunteering. Being involved in Citizen Science, such as monitoring dolphins , is one easy and enjoyable way of contributing to science and may even help prevent the extinction of yet another species. Knowledge is power, and as  research is inherently worthwhile, it also enhances you personally.”

Viv,
Cetacean Steward,
4 years+

Slide One
Slide One
Why I'm a cetacean steward ...

“I first fell in love with dolphins some years ago. I was given a trip to swim with them off Sorrento and was quite reluctant at first due to me being petrified of sharks and not keen on swimming in the ocean either. However, once I saw some dolphins playing and swimming around the boat, I couldn't get in the water quick enough. Well, once I felt their presence and could clearly see them having fun around us, I became quite emotional. This was an experience of a lifetime and one that I will never ever forget. So, to help them into the future, I decide to be steward for them. It is so very important that we all do our best to protect them and their oceans habitat.”

Esther,
Cetacean Steward,
5 years+

Slide One
Slide One
Why I'm a cetacean steward ...

"Seeing a dolphin is something that always makes me smile, no matter what is happening in the world. Being able to help protect these amazing animals by simply reporting when and where I see them, is a fabulously easy way to be a citizen scientist, and even a steward for their future. "

Jen,
Cetacean Steward,
9 years+

Slide One
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Cetacean stewards

Images on this website were taken either under a research permit or from a tour boat under permit that enabled us to get closer than the regulated distances. If you are lucky enough to encounter any cetacean while you are on the water, please abide by your local marine mammal minimum aproach distances. Abiding by these distances decreases the risk of injury and reduces your impact on the cetaceans you are observing.